Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology: From Materials to Functional Structures (2023)

Abstract

Nature has developed high-performance materials and structures over millions of years of evolution and provides valuable sources of inspiration for the design of next-generation structural materials, given the variety of excellent mechanical, hydrodynamic, optical, and electrical properties. Biomimicry, by learning from nature's concepts and design principles, is driving a paradigm shift in modern materials science and technology. However, the complicated structural architectures in nature far exceed the capability of traditional design and fabrication technologies, which hinders the progress of biomimetic study and its usage in engineering systems. Additive manufacturing (three-dimensional (3D) printing) has created new opportunities for manipulating and mimicking the intrinsically multiscale, multimaterial, and multifunctional structures in nature. Here, an overview of recent developments in 3D printing of biomimetic reinforced mechanics, shape changing, and hydrodynamic structures, as well as optical and electrical devices is provided. The inspirations are from various creatures such as nacre, lobster claw, pine cone, flowers, octopus, butterfly wing, fly eye, etc., and various 3D-printing technologies are discussed. Future opportunities for the development of biomimetic 3D-printing technology to fabricate next-generation functional materials and structures in mechanical, electrical, optical, and biomedical engineering are also outlined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1706539
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume30
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • bioinspired mechanics reinforced structure
  • bioinspired optics
  • bioinspired shape-changing structures
  • wearable sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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Yang, Y., Song, X., Li, X., Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Zhou, Q., & Chen, Y. (2018). Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology: From Materials to Functional Structures. Advanced Materials, 30(36), [1706539]. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201706539

Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology : From Materials to Functional Structures. / Yang, Yang; Song, Xuan; Li, Xiangjia et al.

In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 30, No. 36, 1706539, 06.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Yang, Y, Song, X, Li, X, Chen, Z, Zhou, C, Zhou, Q & Chen, Y 2018, 'Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology: From Materials to Functional Structures', Advanced Materials, vol. 30, no. 36, 1706539. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201706539

Yang Y, Song X, Li X, Chen Z, Zhou C, Zhou Q et al. Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology: From Materials to Functional Structures. Advanced Materials. 2018 Sep 6;30(36). 1706539. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201706539

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Yang, Yang ; Song, Xuan ; Li, Xiangjia et al. / Recent Progress in Biomimetic Additive Manufacturing Technology : From Materials to Functional Structures. In: Advanced Materials. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 36.

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abstract = "Nature has developed high-performance materials and structures over millions of years of evolution and provides valuable sources of inspiration for the design of next-generation structural materials, given the variety of excellent mechanical, hydrodynamic, optical, and electrical properties. Biomimicry, by learning from nature's concepts and design principles, is driving a paradigm shift in modern materials science and technology. However, the complicated structural architectures in nature far exceed the capability of traditional design and fabrication technologies, which hinders the progress of biomimetic study and its usage in engineering systems. Additive manufacturing (three-dimensional (3D) printing) has created new opportunities for manipulating and mimicking the intrinsically multiscale, multimaterial, and multifunctional structures in nature. Here, an overview of recent developments in 3D printing of biomimetic reinforced mechanics, shape changing, and hydrodynamic structures, as well as optical and electrical devices is provided. The inspirations are from various creatures such as nacre, lobster claw, pine cone, flowers, octopus, butterfly wing, fly eye, etc., and various 3D-printing technologies are discussed. Future opportunities for the development of biomimetic 3D-printing technology to fabricate next-generation functional materials and structures in mechanical, electrical, optical, and biomedical engineering are also outlined.",

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(Video) NABIAM Webinar on Nanotechnology Part 1

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(Video) Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering and Sciences: Additive Manufacturing

ER -

FAQs

What are some of the future trends within additive manufacturing? ›

Additive will become the dominant mass-manufacturing technique. The complete automation and digital workflow that is possible with polymer additive manufacturing, in particular, will see it replace high volume, serial production techniques that require both high resolution and high productivity at low cost.

How is additive manufacturing used today? ›

Common applications include environmental control systems (ECS) ducting, custom cosmetic aircraft interior components, rocket engines components, combustor liners, tooling for composites, oil and fuel tanks and UAV components. 3D printing delivers complex, consolidated parts with high strength.

What are the 8 steps are to be followed for completing successfully in additive manufacturing process? ›

  • METAL. Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) Electron Beam Melting (EBM)
  • POLIMER. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

What materials are used in additive manufacturing technologies? ›

Three types of materials can be used in additive manufacturing: polymers, ceramics and metals. All seven individual AM processes, cover the use of these materials, although polymers are most commonly used and some additive techniques lend themselves towards the use of certain materials over others.

What is new in additive manufacturing? ›

One of the critical evolutions that makes additive manufacturing suitable for industrial-grade production is the development of new materials. Now, parts can often be 3-D printed with materials that are as strong, durable or flexible as materials used in traditional manufacturing processes.

What is the future of 3D printing technology? ›

Prototyping, which is what 3D printing has been traditionally used for, is expected to grow from $4.4 billion to nearly $10 billion. The largest overall value, however, will likely occur in 3D printing's other primary use: molds and tooling. They will grow from 2020's value of $5.2 billion to $21 billion by 2030.

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